Category Archives: Mountains-to-Sea Trail

The Weekend of Small Hikes

Collier Cove Nature Preserve

Sometimes it’s good to see what’s in your own backyard. While going all around the world is exciting, I know that I’m missing a lot of opportunities right here around Asheville.

This past Saturday, I was introduced to two small areas around Asheville.

I was invited to  talk about the Southern national parks and my book, Forests, Alligators, Battlefields: My Journey through the National Parks of the South. Am I still marketing this book?” You may ask. No, but if a group asks me, I go.

Bev McD. of Carolina Mountain Club asked me to speak to her group, RossCraggen Woods – a private club with a few acres in Arden. But before my talk, Bev took me to see a view of Lake Julian, a Buncombe County Park and power plant. See the picture above.

Bev also showed me Collier Cove Nature Preserve, another county park. It only has 2.5 miles of trail, or so, with some elevation but it’s meant to be a full-day hike. I never would have seen this without Bev’s help. I always like to learn how the public acquired the land.

Buncombe County bought the 29 acres from the Collier Family  in 2012. They had already built  the trails on the property. Twenty-nine acres isn’t much but the land is steep, adding to the interest.

From Lunch Roks

Every bit of land here was owned by someone.

Sometimes the owners actually give the land to the public. Most of the times, the descendants sell the land, but not at market (read “development”) prices.

Sunday I met a small group from the Raleigh Camino group. They had come for a weekend of friendship, food and hiking with the Asheville Camino group.

Most had done the long Asheville Camino hike on Saturday, so they scheduled a five-mile hike to Lunch Rocks on the Mountains-to-Sea Trail.

Raleigh Camino group

Only four hikers showed up because the rest were still recuperating from the 16-mile hike. But that was OK. The hike to Lunch Rocks, MST east of the Folk Art Center, was just the right length before the Raleigh group started out on their long drive.

I need to have a repertoire of short hikes, close to Asheville because they come in handy.

 

 

 

Apostrophes and Periods!

I recently went to a North Carolina Writers Network meeting in Asheville. Nina Hart, Writing from the Top of your Head, was the speaker. She’s a writing and creativity coach, who help people become fearless writers.

Because I write about the outdoors, I don’t have writer’s block. I start with facts, try to make them interesting and relevant, but I can always rely on facts.

The writing exercise was: Write the worst that you can. What??

Since I didn’t know what that meant, I wrote the first thing that came to my head about writing badly: I judge people by their use of apostrophes.

I could go on about the “IT’S” and ITS problem but I’m an outdoor writer.

Poster campaign at OVC

Clingmans Dome

I try to let people know gently that there’s no apostrophe in Clingmans Dome in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Since 1890, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names has been the official arbiter of American place names. This board decided from the very beginning to not use apostrophes. So Clingmans Dome and other place names usually don’t use the possessive form.

Some say that cartographers feared that these punctuation marks could be mistaken for topographic features or symbols. Leaving out the apostrophe reduces the amount of printed type on a map.

Another reason might be that apostrophes suggest possession or associations not meant to be used within the body of a proper name. The idea is that geographic names belong to all of us. Owning a piece of land is not in itself a reason to name it after the landlord.

Another blog quotes Jennifer Runyon, a senior researcher for the board.

“It’s ingrained in us from the first day on the job that geographic names belong to all the people,” she said. “The feeling is that owners come and go, but names are supposed to stand the test of time.”

Gene Espy, 2nd A.T. Thru-Hiker

Appalachian Trail – A.T.

Then there are the periods in A.T. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, which manages the Appalachian Trail, uses periods and that’s the right way. They get to say how to abbreviate their trail.

For completeness, Friends of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail uses MST, without periods. That’s good enough for me.

I’m not a Grammar Vigilante. I don’t try to sneak around fixing grammar on public boards. I just stick to outdoor names.

What you can learn from “writing badly”.

MST-in-a-Day – the Celebrity Hike

Today, I had the pleasure and honor  to lead a celebrity hike on the Mountains-to-Sea Trail for MST-in-a-Day. We walked from the Folk Art Center to the Visitor Center and back – an easy, popular stretch.  We were one of many groups walking the trail from Clingmans Dome to Jockey’s Ridge State Park. Kate Dixon, Executive Director of Friends of the MST, said that she helped kick off MST-in-a-Day at midnight on a hike at Falls Lake State Recreation Area in the Raleigh area.

If you want to know about the features of this section of trail, read my scouting trip report.

We were so lucky to have wonderful weather – sunny, cool and dry. And all the celebrities who said they were coming showed up on time, in the right place, and ready to go. So who were the celebrities? In no particular order,

Dan Brown, retired superintendent of the Blue Ridge Parkway (in the yellow shorts)

Phil Francis, retired superintendent of the Blue Ridge Parkway (somehow missing from the group picture)

John Slaughter, current acting superintendent of the Blue Ridge Parkway (in NPS uniform)

Jennifer Pharr Davis, writer, long-distance hiking record holder, currently hiking the whole MST for Friends of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail, holding Gus, her second child

Karen Chavez, Outdoor editor of the Asheville Citizen-Times with a pink jacket

Carolyn Ward, Executive Director of Blue Ridge Parkway Foundation, in a dark blue shirt, next to Karen

Esther Manheimer, lawyer and mayor of Asheville, in the middle row with a  dark blue long sleeve and sun visor. The boy in back of Esther is her son. Jamie, the woman with the dog, works for the city of Asheville. All three and the dog took off in a run, right after the photos.

Lauren Fortuna, actress. I saw her in the Jeeves play at the NC Stage Company.

John, Danny, Phil and Dan

Those are celebrities!!

Robert G., a new but strong hiker, came along. He wanted to know all about Carolina Mountain Club. I gave him a CMC bookmark and said,”

“I’d love to talk to you but we are in such famous company. Talk to the superintendents. You’ll learn a lot.

Here I am with the three men.

I, too, learned a lot, including that John S. is leaving to go back to his home in the Southern Campaign of the American Revolution parks on September 30. JD Lee, of Big Cypress National Preserve, will become the acting superintendent of the Parkway. Hopefully, by the beginning of the year, the most visited park unit in the country will get a permanent superintendent.

Alarm at The Cove

In case you’re wondering if my hike was just a rerun of the scouting hike, I can report that that we had a little excitement of the non-natural kind.

John and I were deep in conversation, when an alarm started screeching in the woods. It seems that I missed a turn and headed for a fenced-off area of a Christian retreat. We were so stunned that it took us a a moment to figure out what we did.

Everyone but Robert and I (the non-celebrities) stopped at the Visitor Center and found other ways of getting back to their cars. The two of us walked back to our cars at the Folk Art Center. On the way, we made a point of setting the alarm off again. It was fun!

Thank you, all, for coming out… And keep on hiking!