Tag Archives: Hiking

Storing my hiking stuff

I haven’t written a blog post for over a week because I haven’t been hiking. I’ve moved and  downsized from a house to an apartment.

No more garage or extra rooms. No laundry room with a large sink where I can rinse my boots.

Camping in the past

Where do I put all my hiking and camping stuff?

The minimalist websites that I’ve read don’t discuss hiking gear.

I’ve paired down my outdoor stuff as much as I’m willing to.

I’m down to one daypack, one trekking pack and one backpack. No more extra packs or water bottles for guests. They’re going to have to bring their own gear.

I kept a tiny stove and got rid of the leaky tent that I’ve had since Lenny and I backpacked the A.T. A sleeping bag and waffle pad take up most of the room on the closet floor. My two pairs of hiking boots (high tops and low tops) are on a floormat in another closet. The hiking poles hang from a hook like ornaments.

But all the tiny house gurus don’t say the obvious. If you get rid of equipment that takes up space, you’re giving up the activity as well.

I’m not ready to give up camping with Carolina Mountain Club or with my grandkids. The latter requires three sleeping bags, three pads and a large three-person tent. Plus a cooler, a pot and water kettle…

Hannah’s first camping trip

For the first time, I’ve rented a 5 foot by 5 foot storage unit, the smallest available. The camping stuff didn’t even cover the floor. Now a  storage unit is a very dangerous thing to have. Once you have one, you can keep putting other stuff in it. So far, I’m resisting the temptation.

I’m no longer saving my hiking uniform just for hiking.

I’ll wear my shorts and white polyester shirt, separately and together, whenever it makes sense. I’ve also been reading about developing an everyday clothing uniform, like Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg have. Same clothes every day – maybe in different colors.

Sign to Muxia

I wore the same clothes on the Camino de Santiago for weeks, and no one cared.

So why not at home?

Another lesson from the Camino.

FITGO at the YMCA

Did you see the Dennis the Menace cartoon yesterday?

It shows the mom doing yoga. The kids say

“I guess when you get too old to play… You have to exercise.”

Really? What is hiking, biking, canoeing or even yoga, but playing?

And to make it more fun, the Asheville YMCA came up with Fitgo.

The  YMCA Fitgo is a combination of Fitness and Bingo. You get a card with a five by five grid of challenges for a month. Some activities are simple, some take thought, and a couple I am just ignoring.

Fitgo card

Simple Goals – No fast food for three days and Drink no soda for three days. I checked that off the moment I got the card because I haven’t had either for decades.

Same with Eat fresh fruit with your breakfast and Stretch for 15 minutes.- I do those every day.

Goals that take some thoughts –  I didn’t want to count activities that I’ve done before I started Fitgo. So I waited until I did my next yoga class to count it as  group training class, no problem since I go to yoga once or twice a week.

Another goal was to Participate in an outdoor activity – yeah, like hiking.

Swannanoa River

As for volunteering for a service organization, I lead hikes for Carolina Mountain Club, Friends of the Smokies and other nonprofits who ask me.  So I counted my involvement in MST-in-a-Day.

Do an activity together with friends or family – another easy one since all my hiking companions are friends – no double counting was involved.

Since this is the YMCA, the goals also included introducing yourself to three Y members I didn’t know and letting a Y staff person know why you love the Y . I love the Y because it opens at 5 am on weekdays. It give me and lots of other people flexibility.

Now the tough ones. Drink water as your only fluid intake for one day. What? Give up tea? I interpreted this literally – not even herbal tea.

Get eight hours or more of sleep for three days – Are they kidding? I’d love to but if I can sleep more than six hours, it’s a red letter day.

No one can hike every day – certainly I don’t have my life planned to hike every day. So that’s where the YMCA comes in – with or without Fitgo.

Are You All Right?

Are you all right?

Sign to Muxia

I seem to hear this too often these days. People ask me if I’m all right when I step off a curb, stop to get a drink of water on the trail, or when I walk up and even down the steps.

Am I getting too sensitive? Are my antennas up too far?

About ten years ago or so, I was on a small plane landing in a small airport. The passengers needed to walk down the stairs because there wasn’t a jetway.

“Are you all right walking down the stairs?” the flight attendant asked. I was flabbergasted.

“Yes, Are you all right? I replied. She grunted and moved to the next passenger.

Is Are you all right? the new verbal tick? You know, like Good to go, You’re fine and Have a nice day.

I finally realize that this was not a one-off comment but a common phrase from mostly women about twenty years younger than me. Occasionally, I hear it from men of the same age group. But I’ve never heard anyone come up to an older man and ask if he was all right unless he was bleeding on the trail.

If I’m going to write about this, I need to be very specific. I googled the phrase to see if this was a frequent problem. The only helpful website was The Wrong Planet, for people with neurological differences.

One typical answer on this website was:
Why would someone ask you this? Is this a standard greeting? I’ve had a few times when people asked me this, like a weird greeting, but I’m not sure why. It’s unexpected (by me) and I usually respond by freezing, which I guess just makes whatever I was doing seem worse.

Many on this site felt that neurotypical people used the phrase instead of Hello.

At Emerald Bay SP

When I hiked with Family Nature Summits in the Lake Tahoe area, last month, the oldest women, other than me, were in their fifties. They were fit and slim, but not regular hikers.

Jon Krakauer, author of  Into Thin Air about the 1996 Mt. Everest climbing disaster, would call them treadmill fit. Great runners on even ground but if the trail has a few rocks, they would call the hike technical.

The clincher was on a long, steep uphill climbing out of Lake Tahoe to the parking area. The trail was hot and dusty. Halfway up, I stopped at a creek to wet my hat and bandanna. The water on my head felt delicious.

From behind, a woman from our group who had not yet talked to me the entire day, stopped and asked,

“Are you all right?”

“Are you all right? That’s the question. You’re the one behind me.”

Remember the bumper sticker usually on the back of VW Beetles?

I may be slow but I’m ahead of you.

I may not be ahead of you or in front of the group but I’m a plodder. Like a postage stamp, I stick with it until I get there.

Chris and Carroll

While I was thinking about writing about this not-so-new phenomenon, I learned that Carroll Koepplinger, the Ageless Hiker, was going back to Europe to do a long-distance hike in France next month.

He’s almost 87 years old.

Have fun Carroll. I know you’ll be all right.